Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
Earthscope Transportable Array station
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
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The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics is located in La Jolla, and is strongly linked to Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) through joint faculty appointments, research interests, and shared facilities.

News and Events

Congratulations to graduate student Zhitu Ma for winning the Geophysical Journal International prize for best student paper in 2014.  Ma won for his paper “A comprehensive dispersion model of surface wave phase and group velocity for the globe,” Zhitu, M., Laske, G., and Pasyanos, M. (2014) 199 (1): 113-135. (http://bit.ly/1ynAVQm)

The findings of a recent study on Antarctic ice sheet thinning by IGPP geophysicists, Fernando Paolo and Helen Fricker, have been published in the March 26, 2015 issue of Science. Ph.D. student Paolo, glaciologist Fricker, and Laurie Padman, of Earth & Space Research Space Agency, reviewed 18 years of imagery gathered during European Space Agency satellite radar altimetry missions to conduct their research.

The study is remarkable in both the period of time covered (nearly two decades) and its findings: that the thinning of the ice shelf has increased dramatically since 2004.

For more information, click here.

Track GISMOS (GNSS [Global Navigation Satellite System] Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing) as it gathers onshore moisture feeding data (for the 3-4 days of heavy rain forecasted in Northern California). GISMOS is gathering data from its perch aboard the NOAA G-IV aircraft during the NOAA CALWATER2015 Atmospheric Rivers campaign. Go tohttp://airbornescience.nasa.gov/tracker/ and select the NOAA GIV (N49F) on the dropdown list.

GISMOS was created by IGPP geophysicist Jennifer Haase and her colleagues—and funded by a NSF Rapid grant—to capture detailed weather conditions with precision to improve storm predition and modeling. For more information, please visit:http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/new_airborne_gps_technology_for_weather_conditions_takes_flight

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