Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
Earthscope Transportable Array station
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
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The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics is located in La Jolla, and is strongly linked to Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) through joint faculty appointments, research interests, and shared facilities.

News and Events

Congratulations to postdoc Fernando Paolo, recent recipient of the "Most Valued Player" Award within the NASA Cryospheric Sciences Program, for his PhD work on Antarctic ice shelves from satellite radar altimetry. Paolo was presented the award by NASA Cryo PM Tom Wagner at the PARCA meeting at Goddard Space Flight Centre today.

Scripps family members Eaton and Marty Scripps have expressed their support of the GAMES group's interactive, educational outreach efforts with a donation that will fund the groups efforts for one year.  For more information, visit the GAMES website: siogames.ucsd.edu and the full SIO press release here.

AGU's Geophysical Research Letters has published "High basal melting forming a channel at the grounding line of Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica," co-authored by IGPP glaciologists Helen Amanda Fricker and Matt Siegfried. The team, led by Oliver Marsh, University of Canterbury, spent six weeks collecting radar data to map ice melt along the Ross Ice Shelf. The study discovered melt rates vary along the shelf, but that the speed of melt (up to 25 times higher than expected) in some locations may hamper the Ross Ice Shelf's sustainability. 

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