Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
Earthscope Transportable Array station
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
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The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green branch of the University of California Systemwide Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) is located in La Jolla, and is strongly linked to Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) through joint faculty appointments, research interests, and shared facilities. Other IGPP branches can be found at the Los Angeles, Irvine, Santa Cruz and Riverside campuses.

News and Events

IGPP Researcher Hubert Staudigel and his colleagues have been exploring the most extreme environments of Antartica to research the microbes that thrive there to better understand the origins of life on Earth.  The team has both traversed the 12,448-foot  volcano Mt. Erubus as well as performed dry-suit dives beneath Antartica's glowing blue ice to study this remarkable ecosystem. For the full article, click here.

IGPP's Yehuda Bock, director of California Spatial Reference Center, spoke to San Diego's Channel 10 News about the addition of "small, inexpensive seismic and meteorological sensors" to exisitng GPS sensors in San Diego and surrounding Southern California counties.  The sensors, which transmit data in real-time, can detect initial seismic waves.

"Based on that information, we can very quickly, within seconds, determine what the magnitude of the earthquake is going to be," said Bock. 

These sensors will give the public and local safety agencies 30 seconds to two minutes warning time. For more information, click here.

IGPP is thrilled to announce that Distinguished Professor of Geophysics Jean-Bernard Minster has been elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science “for distinguished contributions in the areas of plate motion, crustal deformation, and satellite geodesy, as well as for community leadership and teaching the next generation of geophysicists.” Minster will be inaugurated during a meeting in Chicago in February 2014. Minster is in good company at UCSD, where this year, there were five other recipeints of the honor: http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2013/Nov/28/ucsd-aaas-fellows/?#article-copy. Congratulations Professor Minster! 

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