Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
Earthscope Transportable Array station
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
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The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics is located in La Jolla, and is strongly linked to Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) through joint faculty appointments, research interests, and shared facilities.

News and Events

IGPP Post-Doc Matthew Siegfried is one of three emerging researchers to have their NSF-funded Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project-related research recently published. Siegfrield's West Antarctica Ice-sheet, Subglacial Lake Whillans findings appeared in the 16 March 2016 issue of Geophysical Research Letters (http://goo.gl/CuCTLK).

People may hear SIegfried's first-hand account of his research by attending the 4 May 2016 Polar Seminar (2pm, IGPP, Revelle Room 4301). His talk is titled "From WISSARD to SALSA: The role of subglacial lakes in West Antarctica through a multidisciplinary lens."

Huge congratulations are due to WHOI, the NTSB and the US Coast Guard for successfully locating the voyage data recorder (VDC) of the sunken cargo ship El Faro.  SS El Faro was declared missing October 2, 2015, a day after ship encountered Hurricane Joaquin (cat 3) and communications ceased. Locating  the VDC, an object the size of a basketball, three miles underwater and 41 miles from land, is a tremendous feat and will hopefully help researchers learn more about the shipwreck.  (http://bit.ly/1VXICdP)
 
Owned by the U.S. Navy and operated by WHOI, the research vessel Atlantis was deployed for the search operation. There was tremendous team effort to support the realtime video streaming of the operations was a team effort with teammates from the University of Rhode Island’s Inner Space Center, Comm Systems, Verizon Satellite Solutions Group , and IGPP/SIO’s HiSeasNet (HSN: https://hiseasnet.ucsd.edu).
 
HSN is a provider of satellite based Internet access to the Atlantis.  In this instance, HSN provided the Atlantis with its ship to shore equipment while Verizon Satellite Solutions Group (via NTSB) provided the shore to ship equipment and the space segment.  Satellite bandwidth was contributed by the Ocean Exploration Trust, operator of the EV Nautilus.  For the search effort, HSN upgraded the Atlantis satellite equipment to enabled live HD video feeds from seafloor to NTSB headquarters. The upgrade will also make future bandwidth expansions possible to support future telepresence needs of scientific teams on the Atlantis. 

 

The Huffington Post's Max Gunn shares his admiration for the storied curiosity and career of IGPP's Walter Munk in this excellent essay.  Gunn's coverage includes Munk's tenacity at the Pentagon in getting the Allies to accept wave propagation prediction for safer beach landings during World War 2, his breakthrough research allowing deep sea drilling, his current research and his current climate concerns. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/max-guinn/an-interview-with-world-r_b_9774592.html

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