Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
Earthscope Transportable Array station
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
Lava Flow on the Big Island of Hawaii. Photo by H. Staudigal.
Visualization of the Lake Tahoe region, which focuses on a swarm of deep earthquakes in the late 2003. Created by D. Kilb and G. Kent
Visualization of the 2010 Chile magnitude 8.8 earthquake and initial aftershocks. Created by D. Kilb.
Aerial view of IGPP. Photo by S. Green.
An Earthscope Transportable Array station in Almira, Washington. Photo by F. Vernon.
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The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics is located in La Jolla, and is strongly linked to Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) through joint faculty appointments, research interests, and shared facilities.

News and Events

The tremendous career and unabating curiosity of IGPP's Walter Munk, "Einstein of the Oceans," featured in the NY Times

Earlier this summer IGPP Associate Professor Kerry Key, in collaboration with USGS, Alaska Volcano Observatory, and University of Wisconsin Madison colleagues, traveled to Umnak Island to commence study of the magma—how it’s formed, where it’s stored—beneath Okmok Volcano. The study “Magnetotelluric and Seismic Investigation of Okmok Volcano," is part of in NSF-funded GeoPRISMS (Geodynamic Processes at Rifting and Subducting Margins) program—"designed to investigate the architecture, mechanics and plumbing of continental margins at subduction zones and continental rifts, including what controls geohazards such as earthquakes and volcanoes,” specifically in the Aleutian Arc.

The newly installed array of seismic and magnetotelluric sensors across Okmok will allow Key and his colleagues to image the volcano’s magma “plumbing system.” To learn more about the installation process and objectives, follow the team’s Okmok blog: http://okmok.ucsd.edu. The NSF has posted a press release which nicely explains the the GeoPRISMS program, introducing its participants and objectives: http://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc_summ.jsp?cntn_id=135851&org=NSF.

Congratulations to Anne Pommier, whose paper "Experimental constraints on the electrical anisotropy of the lithosphere–asthenosphere system," appears in the 11 June 2015 issue of Naturehttp://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v522/n7555/full/nature14502.html

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