The Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics is located in La Jolla, and is a Division of SIO.

Recent News

HPWREN ALERTWildfire workshops to create "Virtual Fire Towers"

HPWREN's ALERTWildfire network of cameras proved effective in pinpointing remote, forested regions of Southern California fire locations in the summer of 2018. This success has fostered plans to broaden the network by creating "virtual fire towers." On April 24th, HPWREN co-founders Hans-Werner Braun (SDSC) and Frank Vernon (IGPP) workshopped with stakeholders and first responders at Palomar Obervatory to discuss the network deterimine its future growth. For more information, visit: http://hpwren.ucsd.edu/news/20190424/

Walter Munk: October 19, 1917 - February 8, 2019

It is with heavy hearts that we share the loss of IGPP's founder and first director, Walter Munk, who passed away Friday, February 8th.

Born October 19, 1917, Walter was an intellectual giant, and his pioneering research into surf forecasting, swell propagation, ocean currents, tides, time series analysis, ocean acoustics, and ocean temperature, along with his abundant prizes and accolades, will be remembered by many.  However, all those of us who frequented the halls of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics La Jolla will have a special memory of him.   

Pommier, Roberts web app SIGMELTS 2.0 featured in EOS highlights

The SIGMELTS app, created and built by Anne Pommier and Jeff Roberts, has been featured in on EOS highlights! SIGMELTS is a software for geophysicists and petrologists that aims to improve the interpretation of detected magnetotelluric anomalies in Earth’s crust and mantle and track the sources of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Orcutt appointed new Chair of MSROC

Congratulations to John Orcutt who is the newly appointed Chair for the ‘Marine Seismic Research Oversight Committee’ or MSROC.  

Fricker, ICESat 2 interview on NPR's Here and Now

Helen Fricker was interviewed on NPR's Here and Now today to discuss the recent launch of NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite, ICESat-2. ICESat-2’s launch represents the culimination of 10 years of work by Fricker and her collegues.  From orbit, the satellite will measure tiny changes in the ice sheets and better help climate researchers understand, in real-time, the speed of melt in Antarctica.

Subscribe to Recent News