Recent News

Fricker, colleagues share ICE-Sat2 findings in Science, NY Times


Congratulations to Helen Fricker and her colleagues who were able to share their ICE-Sat2-enhanced understanding of Antarctic ice thinning in Science. The New York Times picked up the story and provides both a link to the article and a summary here.

IGPP Virtual Seminar Series Presents: Matthias Morzfeld

IGPP is pleased to invite you to join its Virtual Seminar Series presentation featuring Matthias Morzfeld, IGPP's newest faculty memeber. Dr.

IGPP Virtual Seminar Series Presents: Jenny Suckale

IGPP is pleased to invite you to join in its inaugural Virtual Seminar Series presentation featuring Jenny Suckale from Stanford's Department of Geophysics. Dr. Suckale's talk, "To slide or to flow: Studying extremes in different natural systems sheds light on common physical processes," will be available via Zoom on Tuesday, April 21, starting at 12noon.

Mw 4.9 Anza Earthquake is right on time according to Kilb

During an uncertain time, one thing remains reliable. According to IGPP seismologist, Debi Kilb, today’s Mw 4.9 earthquake near Anza, CA was right on schedule: "The Anza region has an earthquake over Mw 4.5 approximately every three years," according to Kilb. "Be prepared not scared!"

Haase launches GNSS into the stratosphere

Check out the video of IGPP's Jennifer Haase launching a GNSS experiment into the stratosphere! The goal is to measure temperature profiles of the atmosphere to detect and quantify the amount of gravity wave energy so it can be included in climate models. View here.

Fricker talks to BBC, Amery Ice Shelf prediction

IGPP glaciologist Helen Fricker predicted that the Amery Ice Shelf would calve its "Loose Tooth" by 2015. The day after Amery calved D28, Fricker spoke to the BBC about the event and her earlier prediction. Though it remains "wobbly," Amery shed a much larger iceberg, D28, which Fricker described to the BBC as being "the molar compared to a baby tooth." While this event is unrelated to climate change, "there is no cause for alarm yet for this particular ice shelf," Fricker added.